The Devil in the Flesh Medical Are You Struggling With Addiction? Follow These Steps To Get Help By Julian Mitton, MD

Are You Struggling With Addiction? Follow These Steps To Get Help By Julian Mitton, MD

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When you’re struggling with addiction, it can feel like you’re alone in the world. You might feel like no one understands what’s going on inside your head and that no one could possibly help you. But let me tell you something: I’ve been there, too. The thing is, though, that there are people who want to help us recover from addiction—and all we have to do is ask for their help.

Take A Look At Your Life

The first step to getting help is understanding the problem, says Julian Mitton, MD. Take a look at your life, and consider what you are experiencing–are there signs that you may have an addiction? Look at the big picture:

• What are the consequences of your addiction? Are you hurting yourself or those around you?
• What does this mean for your future if nothing changes? Is it likely that things will get better on their own, or do they seem like they could only get worse from here (or both)?

Find A Good Treatment Center

If you’re struggling with addiction, it’s important to find the right treatment center. There are many different types of facilities and programs out there, so it can be difficult to know where to start looking.
If you want to get help for your addiction, here are some things to consider:

• Look for a center that has a good track record. You want to make sure that the program will actually work for your needs and goals. The best way of doing this is through research–look at reviews online (and don’t trust Yelp reviews too much). Julian Mitton, MD Call up previous clients and ask them how they feel about their experience at the facility; if possible, visit in person so that you can ask questions directly from those who have been there before!

• Make sure they can meet your specific needs as well as those of any family members who may also need treatment services themselves or support during recovery processes like therapy sessions or group meetings held by counselors/therapists employed by these facilities’ staff members.*

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